Why People Get Depressed and Anxious in the Spring

Why People Get Depressed and Anxious in the Spring


Why can good weather bring on bad moods?

Change. For starters, it’s change. While some human beings thrive on unsteady ground, most of us fear movement of any kind. All change — even the good and healthy change we need and pursue — brings with it an element of anxiety. That’s especially the case for highly sensitive folks among us who are easily prone to anxiety and depression.

HormonesJust as the lack of sunlight may alter brain levels of certain mood-controlling chemicals — such as the hormone melatonin — in July, the same moody chemicals and their messengers get confused when the light comes out in the spring. In fact, ten percent of people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) experience symptoms in reverse: Once the weather turns warm, they grow melancholy. Any shift in our circadian rhythm — a 24-hour cycle that tells our bodies when to sleep, eat, work, and take a phone call from our parents — can produce feelings of anxiety.

Memories. Spring months hold so many milestones, like graduations and weddings. We look back with nostalgia or regret or with unfulfilled dreams and desires. This season of rebirth prods us to keep moving … maybe too quickly. Perhaps we’re not ready yet.

Allergies and toxins.  Every year we confronted by more and more environmental toxins and the resulting allergies. If you are sensitive to environmental toxins — and the majority of us are — you may very well have a harder time in the spring because the blowing winds and warmer temperatures can kick up a ton of irritants that, in turn, cause inflammation in your brain and bad moods.

If you are suffering from depression visit THE SOUTH AFRICAN DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP for help and more information.